Books, galore! Reviews & rambles

My reading pace has really picked up over the last year and that’s one thing I can accredit to taking a break from life’s responsibilities. I write very spontaneous reviews on basically anything I read, that seems worthy of writing about. If you have any recommendations of books that I might enjoy, based on the titles I’ve already read (or maybe randomly), don’t hesitate to drop me a comment and I’ll be sure to check it out!

BOOK REVIEW: The Dead Zone by Stephen King

Adored by his parents, Vera and Herb Smith, The Dead Zone’s tragic hero Johnny Smith is an only child bearing an unremarkable name and an unremarkable life, for all extents and purposes. This is until one day at the ice rink when Johnny has an accident which leads to a…

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CURRENT READ: The Dead Zone

Current read: The Dead Zone by Stephen King⚰️ Synopsis so far (no spoilers!): Schoolteacher Johnny Smith, with a life full of possibilities ahead of him, has an almost-fatal car accident and winds up comatose for five years. When he wakes up, he learns his girlfriend has moved on and married…

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Book Haul

The result of my first physical book haul in more than a year!🤤 Today I ventured into the city centre (cautiously of course, I’m a recovering agoraphobic!) and exercised a LOT of self restraint in Waterstones. I was overwhelmed with choices as I spotted so many titles from my virtual…

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ANNOUNCEMENT: Launch of @bookishpip (my new bookstagram!)

I follow so many bookstagrams and have been inspired to read many a title by the reviews/recommendations of accounts that are authentic, honest and so passionate about books. It only occurred to me a few days ago that I could create one, too! After much deliberation, I decided to take…

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BOOK REVIEW: The Midnight Library by Matt Haig

My love for @mattzhaig and his profound writing continues. I really do believe that my love of books and literature has saved me in recent years. In Midnight Library, Nora Seed learns that books offer infinite possibilities. I concur. They’re new, exciting worlds and brave characters who take us out of our…

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BOOK REVIEW: Circe by Madeline Miller

Miller’s Circe is a living, breathing emblem of a well-written woman, as real and complicated as any you might pass on the street. This is her greatest victory with the book and it was utterly stunning to read.

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Stephen King’s Under the Dome

Halfway through this girthy badboy and already thinking about what Stephen King books I need to order for when I’m done… The obsession with the King of Horror continues strong after 15 months of faithful reading ☠️ Reading was my first love and it honestly feels so great to be…

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BOOK REVIEW: Desperation by Stephen King

And so, the obsession with Stephen King continues. It’s been more than a year of this now. I’ve managed to make my way through quite a few of King’s most acclaimed bibliography, based on recommendations from friends and family, but there’s a comfort in knowing that there’s plenty more out…

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BOOK TALK: Fanon’s The Wretched of The Earth

The Wretched of the Earth resonated back then, when it was just a discussion piece in a classroom, but has also gone on to be applicable as a crucial text for movements such as Black Lives Matter in light of the world in a post-George Floyd era…

I love that good literature only ages like fine wine. Somehow, no matter how much has changed since the first publication, the words stick and seem to serve as educational tools and solace for lots of readers, across different countries in different time zones (perhaps even ones who weren’t intended as the key demographic).

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BOOK REVIEW: Amazing Disgrace by Grace Campbell

This woman is unashamedly herself from the outset: sex-positive, political, intelligent, hilarious and surprisingly very vulnerable, opening up about the kind of experiences we all have as young women, but very often fail to articulate.

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BOOK REVIEW: Joan Didion – The Year of Magical Thinking

Joan Didion is one of the most prolific journalists and fiction writers of our time, and I’m ashamed to say I only found out about her two weeks ago. In yet another glib, pandemic-inflicted Netflix peruse, I found a short docu-film about Didion (The Center Will Not Hold), directed/narrated by…

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BOOK & ADAPTATION REVIEW: Normal People

At the heart of the novel is the prominence of all that is left unsaid: there are often heartbreaking exchanges that consist of misunderstandings, fuelled by the silence of repressed responses.

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BOOK REVIEW: The Third Life of Grange Copeland (1970)

Just a note: In my final year of university, I looked into slave narratives and the black identity (predominantly by female authors) in literature. I’ve plucked a short excerpt from some of my notes on one of my favourite novels, one that is often overshadowed by the likes of The…

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BOOK REVIEW: Burmese Days by George Orwell

The term ‘great’ could connote many things, yet for ethnic minorities and immigrants who have cemented their lives in the West, even after offering invaluable contributions to society, there is still the threat of persecution.

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BOOK REVIEW: Room by Emma Donoghue

*Note: I initially submitted this essay for a formative assignment during my undergraduate degree* Room – A Story Of Hope A book that can be read within one sitting is an elusive find and that, I would argue, is what makes Room so special. Emma Donoghue is no stranger to…

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BOOK REVIEW: The Stand

Last night, I finally finished the girthy Stephen King novel that I started more than a month ago. I’ve been recommended this book on several occasions by people who share an interest in either King’s back-catalogue of absolute bangers or an appreciation of dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction in general. Regarded…

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Hello sunshine, my old friend (a life update)

At long last, I am performing my humanness with some success again- I couldn’t have envisioned this at all a few months ago, so I’ll accept the train woes, arguments with loved ones, giggles with my best mates on video calls and my worsening glasses prescription.

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BOOK REVIEW: This is Going to Hurt by Adam Kay

Kay’s depiction of the chaos within NHS wards is both hilarious and poignant, all at the same time. It’s an essential book that ought to be read by everybody in order to understand exactly what our absentee friends in training or uncle (who is only seen at a birthday party every four years or so) are really going through.

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BOOK REVIEW: The Shining

The fact that King can make you feel the isolation, anxiety and insanity, as though you’re physically stuck with the Torrance family in the middle of a snow fortress, is a testament to his craftmanship as the King of Horror.

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CURRENT READ: The Thirteenth Tale

Really digging Diane Setterfield’s ‘Thirteenth Tale’. I wouldn’t ordinarily pick up a title like this but I watched the film adaptation starring Olivia Coleman and really enjoyed the gothic tone. Probably my favourite aspect of the novel is the protagonist’s love for books. ‘People disappear when they die. Their voice,…

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Bookdate

Missed a lot of developments over the past few years in Bradford, including this amazing lil’ set-up nestled amongst the dilapidated shop fronts on Darley Street. I popped in today to see what was up. I found these beauties (as pictured). The principle is: you just walk in and pick…

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BOOK REVIEW: Boy A by Jonathan Trigell

Perhaps the most disturbing aspect of Boy A is its ability to problematise and distort the black-and-white perception of a child murderer- we find ourselves sympathising, in part, for a broken young man who is depersonalised by the general public and longing for a place to belong. There’s an innocence about Jack Burridge, a quality that makes you almost support him in his quest for redemption and acceptance.

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Current (Re)Read

Imagine being so traumatised by a book that you end up experiencing fevered hallucinations in the middle of the night. Imagine being forced to delete about 95% or the book’s content from your brain just to carry on with life, without it affecting you too badly. Imagine re-reading that book,…

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